AfroLezfemcentric Perspectives on Coloring Gender and Queering Race

Incest and rape are words that never fully capture the horrifying and lasting imprint that these experiences leave on minds, bodies, psyches, and spirits both of those who have survived and the many others who have not. I fully credit the work of many unknown and known courageous racially/ethnically diverse women who began the second wave of this movement in the late 1960s and early 1970s for their tireless organizing and activist efforts in placing ending violence against women and children at the forefront of local, state, and national agendas. Even with the tremendous progress and inroads made, the racist and sexist stereotype that Black women and girls are incapable of being raped or otherwise physically or sexually assaulted still prevails.

Intersectionality and Intimate Partner Violence: Barriers Women Face

Intimate partner violence (IPV) against women is likely to involve physical, sexual, emotional, and financial abuse and is still treated somewhat as a private issue. Until the 1980s, the American Bar Association advised police to avoid arrest and engage in conflict resolution.  This was common practice until the Domestic Violence Movement aided in changing social constructs and encouraging pro-arrest and mandatory arrest policies. However, Lockwood and Prohaska (2015) found that police are still less likely to respond with the same vigor to IPV as they are to the violence against men. The 1994 Violence Against Women Act encouraged prosecutors to charge IPV offenders with their crimes. This led to “no-drop” policies.

Intimate Violence, Societal Violence: Online Exclusives

These online exclusives are freely accessible articles that are part of an ongoing special series associated with Tikkun’s Winter 2016 print issue, Intimate Violence, Societal Violence. An Invitation to Community: Restorative Justice Circles for Intimate Partner Violence
EMILY GAARDNER

Intimate Partner Violence and Intimate Partner Justice: How Spiritual Teachings Impact Both
REV. AL MILES

AfroLezfemcentric Perspectives on Coloring Gender and Queering Race
AISHAH SHAHIDAH SIMMONS

Intersectionality and Intimate Partner Violence: Barriers Women Face
VENESSA GARCIA AND PATRICK McMANIMON

If you appreciated these free web-only articles, please help enable us to keep up this important work by becoming a print subscriber or offering a donation.

The Problem of Evil: Campus, 1968

A Short Story

Elena was saying something about how exploited the TA’s were. Maureen, who was also a TA, leaned her head closer, trying to hear her above the din of the students’ chatter in the cavernous auditorium. Then Elena suddenly sat up and pointed toward the front. A short man with long, wavy white hair was rapping a ruler against the podium, attempting to get the students’ attention. He began clearing his throat authoritatively.

Through Amichai’s Window

Editor’s note: We deeply appreciate the way that Yehuda Amichai was available to Tikkun magazine. He not only allowed many of his poems to be printed in Tikkun, but also participated in the Tikkun Conference in Jerusalem, where we brought together all the various factions of the Israeli peace movement to reflect on why they had been less successful than they could have been. Amichai's presence there, and his reading of his poetry as part of the conference program, was a powerful statement of his commitment to peace and reconciliation with the Palestinian people. 

A widely acclaimed poet of the 20th century, Yehuda Amichai was a voice of sanity in a world that often denies it. Born in Germany, Amichai immigrated to Palestine in the mid-1930s and spent the rest of his life trying to make sense of the calamitous events that his generation endured. He won numerous awards, both in Israel and abroad, and was a frequent contender for the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Fall 2015 Table of Contents

This quarterly issue of the magazine is available both online and in hard copy. The full online articles are only available to subscribers and NSP members — subscribe or join now to read the rest! You can also buy a paper copy of this single print issue. Members and subscribers get online access to the magazine. If you are a member or subscriber who needs guidance on how to register, email miriam@tikkun.org or call 510-644-1200 for help — registration is easy and you only have to do it once.

What’s Next for Israel/Palestine

Non-subscribers: This forum is available as featured open-access content on our publisher's website. What's Next for Israel/Palestine? An Introduction
MICHAEL LERNER

Until Two States Exist, Palestinians Deserve Voting Rights in Israel
DAVID BIALE

The Logic of Abandoning the Two-States Campaign
REBECCA SUBAR

Nonviolence, BDS, and the Dream of Beloved Community in Palestine/Israel
LYNN GOTTLIEB

We Need to Make Peace More Lucrative Than Occupation
RAJA SHEHADEH

Israel Can't Have It Both Ways: Recognize Palestine or Grant Equal Rights
SAM BAHOUR AND TONY KLUG

The Only Road to Sustainable Peace: Pluralistic Democracy
MAZIN QUMSIYEH

If You Want Justice, Support All Forms of Nonviolent Pressure on Israel
REBECCA VILKOMERSON

Escaping the Two-State Snare
IAN S. LUSTICK

Moving Beyond the One-State/Two-State Debate
ANDREW ARATO

Israel's Human Shields Defense: Shielding Israeli War Crimes
OVADIA EZRA

A New Horizon for Peace: An Israel-Palestine Union
OREN YIFTACHEL

State-Building Can Pave the Way to Statehood: Lessons from Kurdistan
REUVEN KIMELMAN

Israeli Elections Won't End Oppression in Palestine/Israel
AMER SHURRAB

Closing Thoughts on “What's Next for Israel/Palestine?”
MICHAEL LERNER

Online Exclusives

These online exclusives  are freely accessible articles that are part of an ongoing special series associated with Tikkun’s Fall 2015 print issue, What's Next For Israel/Palestine. A Two-State Solution is the Only Option
ALON BEN-MEIR

The Legacy of Jewish Trauma
TIRZAH FIRESTONE

"The Ploughshare Without Fear": Remembering Martin Buber (1878-1965)
CAROL ASCHER

Communities of Faith Must Join to Demand an Arms Embargo
TIMOTHY R. PRISK

Moving Beyond Despair
DOV WAXMAN

The Problem with Solutions
NOAH HABEEB

On the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, Back to Democratic Basics
SAM SUSSMAN

If you appreciated these free web-only articles, please help enable us to keep up this important work by becoming a print subscriber or offering a donation.

Dante’s Politics

The decorative mosaic adorning the ancient synagogue floor

is innocent of its future. Good luck, it means to say, or

 

my swastika hands miming perpetual motion wish you

everlasting peace and prosperity. And what coincidence

 

sends my son running across the plaza, blowing again

and again on his precious pinwheel toy? Say what you mean,

 

I want to shout. I am listening to the politicians

in the courtyard, excavating for small truths buried

 

beneath thick stratum of tedious lies.

The Problem is that Life is Imperfect

The best way to achieve Mr. Gabel’s noble goals is, first, to recognize what can and cannot be accomplished by the various decision-making institutions in our society, and then to try to equip them to perform optimally in their areas of influence.

A Response to Gary Peller

The desire for mutual recognition is not an abstract universal, but a concrete universal manifested in all human situations as an expression of the very meaning of what it means to be a social human being.

History and Transcendence

The imposition of the “desire for mutual recognition” as the universal that ties us all together in common humanity onto the description of every social phenomena is ahistorical and undialectical—it fails to account for the concrete particulars of time and space that give exercises of social power a particular spin and story.