Coopting the Beatles

Peter Gabel argues that, in coopting songs from the 1960s, advertisers not only increase their profits but also strip the songs of their transcendental sense of meaning and purpose.

Protected: Download Radical Amazement – NSP Members Only

Welcome! Thank you for being a member of the Network of Spiritual Progressives. Together we are helping to transform our world into one where love, generosity, and environmental sanity are our Bottom Line. As a member of the NSP, you have exclusive access to this specially curated album below. We hope that you’ll enjoy it as much as we do. Radical Amazement is a collection of songs by a diverse array of artists, all who shares the NSP’s message.

Crossing Borders, Planting Olive Trees

Joshua Davis has played music in South American rainforests, on the promenade in Havana, in old mining towns in Michigan, and beyond. But Tuwani, a village in the Palestinian West Bank, tested his comfort level perhaps more than any previous gig.

A Jewish Composer for Our Time

Who knew that by 2012 the world of classical music would be so wonderfully eclectic, unpredictable, and adventurous? Who knew that composers would freely borrow from folk and popular styles, as well as ancient traditions? Listeners are welcoming this trend with relish, turning toward this “new” music for inspiration, soul nourishment, and a connection to ancient roots.

Word Jazz: Music and the Poetry of Rav Kook

We can sense the shared matrix of poetry and music in the rhythmic loam of language from which they both arose. Some of our languages preserve the connection in name: in Hebrew we use shirah to signify both song and poem, as if all song implies poetry and all poetry implies music.

Can’t Stop the SlingShot: Hip-Hop Arises in Palestine

We watch a group of five rappers prepare for their first show in their hometown. Dressed in requisite hip-hop style—football jerseys, baseball caps, and the like—the performers primp nervously and practice their rhymes, while they talk about their pre-show jitters. This could be any crew of kids in the world that’s recently found a voice in the global phenomenon of rap music. But the impact hits as we watch them enter a modest club to their friends’ greetings, and then hit the stage after one of them gets on the mic and announces: “We are PR, the first rappers from Gaza.”