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Archive for the ‘Environment’ Category



Sea Change: The Paper Boats of the People’s Climate March and the Case for Love

Sep20

by: on September 20th, 2014 | 2 Comments »

copyright 2013 Eiren Caffall

There is a theory out there in nature education circles that preparing children for climate change means steering clear of scaring them until they are old enough to handle it. David Sobel, author of Children’s Special Places, is often credited with the mantra, “no disasters before fourth grade,” and he writes eloquently about the notion that you must first ask children to love nature before you ask them to save it.

There are lots of people who champion this view. Recently, Grist published a profile of Liam Hennegan, a professor of environmental science at DePaul University, who has strong opinions about what books should be on a children’s environmental curriculum. He lists classics like The Hobbit, Where the Wild Things Are, and Bridge to Terabithia, not one of them mentioning a word about rising carbon emissions. Instead, the books are gorgeous works that you and I might remember from our own childhoods, full of the pleasures of being in nature, the desire to know and change a special place, and to build story, history, and relationship with it.

I was obsessed with Bridge to Terabithia as a kid. And, I was lucky enough to have access to a stream in my back yard, one that was like the stream in the book. I had hours of time to explore it, with no adults supervising my play. This stream was in the back field that ran behind our house in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. We lived over a gas station during the gas crisis of the 1970′s. My mother was in training for her eventual career in hydrogeology, meaning that I grew up hearing about the oil crisis, waste water runoff, leach fields, and superfund clean-up sites.

I had access to plenty of information about disasters before fourth grade.

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Do We Have the Wisdom to Survive?

Sep20

by: on September 20th, 2014 | 2 Comments »

Wisdom to Survive documentary

Fires are burning week after week again this year here in rural Northern California. The smoky skies aggravate asthma, give people headaches, burn people’s eyes, and make people grouchy. We are warned to stay indoors due to unsafe levels of particulates. As climate change continues to accelerate, other people in other places are also experiencing record-setting fires, heat waves, droughts, floods, and other extreme weather events.

Do we have the wisdom to survive? Will humanity rise to the challenge presented by climate change? Will we change our ways of thinking and acting, will we transform our institutions and systems, in time to prevent climate chaos? This question is always with me, even as I gather my grandchildren close to me and play and laugh and learn with them. What will this overheating planet be like for them in twenty or forty or sixty years?

I do have hope. I am grateful to be part of a world-wide community of people who are aware of what is at stake with the earth’s changing climate and who are willing to take action. Tomorrow, the largest People’s Climate March in history will be held in New York, as world leaders gather in New York to discuss the climate crisis. There will be solidarity demonstrations around the world, including in Oakland, Davis, Sacramento, and here in Nevada City. I hope that everyone who can come out will come out. The time is now.

Regardless of what you think about climate change, I recommend the film “Wisdom to Survive.” Here is the blurb I wrote for Old Dog Documentaries to help get the word out about the film:

Wisdom to Survive: Climate Change, Capitalism, and Community is an exquisitely filmed documentary that presents an overview of the climate crisis, including its causes, effects, and directions of hope. Poignant scenes illustrate the sacred beauty of the natural world, the tragedy of its diminishment, and our human interconnectedness with the rest of creation.

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Why Noah’s Ark?

Sep17

by: on September 17th, 2014 | Comments Off

Originally published on National Catholic Reporter

Noah's ark climate march

The ark comes to mind as a good symbol for crowded, unpleasant conditions, ones we get when try to repair or resurrect the environment, along with Noah. Credit: Creative Commons/Taiwan boi

We are five days out from the People’s Climate March in New York. The ark, a float in the upcoming march, is built and on its flatbread truck on its way to Manhattan.

You are probably wondering why the ark became the symbol for Green Faith.  Obviously, we are looking for a miracle to happen on September 21. We want God to repent God’s anger and give us one more chance.  We want to see the bow in the sky.  And we are mightily interested in all the colors of all the animals on earth coming together to create a new beginning for humanity.  In fact, the biggest question being asked internally about the march is why people of color should participate in it.  The answers so far are less invitational than they might be.  But I’ll get to that.

We know the march will be big, if for no other reason than our phones are ringing off their hooks. We don’t yet know if it will be a miracle or not.  Miracles are something the divine pulls off, even if we assist mightily as partners in miracle making.  Plus, there is always the possibility it is too late for the climate and that repair, not restoration or new beginning, is all that we can hope for.


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Campaign Nonviolence:  A Call to Transformation

Sep11

by: on September 11th, 2014 | Comments Off

 

 

Why do I engage in nonviolent direct action? Why will I go back to Beale Air Force Base (home of the Global Hawk surveillance drone which helps find targets for weaponized drones) later this month to demonstrate, even as all the charges against me and other anti-drone demonstrators have been dropped? Because I believe that through nonviolent action we can be transformed and can contribute to the transformation of the world.


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Lauren Szabo Finds Art Out Of The Mundane

Sep10

by: Olivia Wise on September 10th, 2014 | Comments Off

Olivia Wise conducted the following interview with Lauren Szabo to inquire about her experimental and esoteric artwork.

Prompted by childhood memories of LA fires and earthquakes, you have been painting scenes of deconstruction for over ten years. Could you start by talking some about what “deconstruction” means for you, and how you define it?

Deconstruction is urban decay. It is when man-made construction is in a state of decomposition. It is a subject in which its materials are returning to an organic state. The subjects are man’s invention intercepted nature’s hand. Deconstructing subjects illustrate the concept of time and its life cycle.

What sustains your ongoing interest in deconstruction?

I follow my gut and try to remain honest about what moves me. I cannot tame what inspires me, and I am constantly finding subject matter that inspires me to paint. When I find my subjects I am hit with intense interest, intuition, and passion. I have often thought the series would end, but instead I feel it is evolving.


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Our Josephs, Our Choices

Aug12

by: Paul Tesser and David Steinberg on August 12th, 2014 | 1 Comment »

Pharaoh Joseph

Credit: Creative Commons-Flickr pcstratman

In the Torah (specifically, the portion of Mikeitz), we read of Pharaoh’s dreams and Joseph’s interpretations of them. As we know, Joseph explained the dreams to mean that there would be seven years of plentiful harvests in the land of Egypt followed by seven years of severe famine. In this way, Joseph was not only an interpreter but also a prophet, having interpreted the prophetic dreams that God gave to Pharaoh.

Pharaoh’s dreams speak to our own day, a day during which droughts, typhoons, and hurricanes of increasing severity are more and more frequent. These are the equivalents of Pharaoh’s dreams: disturbing, anomalous manifestations of something that calls out for interpretation.

But what is our equivalent of Joseph? We have but to think for a moment to realize that among us are men and women who interpret the overall shape of the novel climate events we have been witnessing – climate scientists. With respect to these phenomena, they are the best interpreters of what is occurring.And the consensus is in. Peer-reviewed science journals report that there is no longer the slightest quibble about the reality of climate change.


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July 4: Picnics to Honor Human and Environmental Rights

Jun25

by: on June 25th, 2014 | 1 Comment »

Let’s use July 4 to celebrate all those who have stood up for peace and non-violence, social and economic justice, environmental sanity, human rights, and a world of love and generosity!

We at the Network of Spiritual Progressives invite you to create a local picnic to honor all those in the past and all those in the current world (including YOU) who have taken steps to move the world toward a more loving and just, peaceful and non-violent, environmentally sustainable and generosity-filled reality. Not just the famous people, though we’ll also honor the MLK jrs and the freedom riders and the women who were in the vanguard of the 2nd wave of feminism and the brave glbtq people who fought against homophobia, but ALSO the people who took risks at a smaller level, in their personal lives, possibly alienating friends or family or risking their professional or job advancement, or in other ways that you can tell us. So bring your stories to this celebration.

Here in Berkeley where our office is, we are inviting anyone in Northern California who wants a different kind of energy on July 4 than that of “rockets were there, the bombs bursting in air,” to come to an NSP (Network of Spiritual Progressives) picnic starting at2 p.m.at Picnic Area No. 1 of the Live Oak Park, 1301 Shattuck ave, Berkeley (look for us–you’ll find us in a somewhat hidden area). At2:30we’ll have vegetarian pot-luck. At3:30we’ll start the program and Achi Ben Shalom will lead the music. Please bring songs, poetry, your own stories of how you’ve stood up for peace, justice and/or environmental sanity, and your musical instruments to sing along! We’d welcome your political organization, synagogue, church, mosque or ashram to cosponsor this event with us–let us know! Later that night you’ll be invited to celebrate the Sabbath with Rabbi Lerner at his home at7 p.m.–an energy that will offset the noise of fireworks, at least partially.

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The Greenest Man in America!

Jun24

by: on June 24th, 2014 | Comments Off

Going green is about more than buying all the gluten-free quinoa you can fit in your Prius. It’s about community organizing against corporate polluters and challenging environmental racism — and then enjoying your quinoa.

That’s the message from my good friend, the “Greenest Man in America.” If you haven’t met him yet, you’re in luck!
And no, he’s not Al Gore…


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The ESRA Needs Your Support on Moveon.org!

Jun12

by: on June 12th, 2014 | 2 Comments »

Please take a second to sign the petition for the ESRA–Environmental and Social Responsibility Amendment to the US Constitution! We are working with Moveon.org to get our campaign better known, but they’ll only help us if we can demonstrate real support for this approach. It is by far the most comprehensive strategy to save the life-support-system of Earth, and the only way that can withstand being declared unconstitutional by the current reactionary Supreme Court.

It takes less than a minute! Even if you already signed it on the Tikkun website, the Moveon.org people need to see that there are enough people behind it to give it their attention and support, so we need to ask you to sign it again. And then PLEASE SEND IT OUT TO EVERYONE ON YOUR EMAIL LISTS, FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND EVERY OTHER PLACE, FROM YOU, ASKING THEM TO SIGN THE PETITION AS IT APPEARS ON THE MOVEON PAGE:

petitions.moveon.org/sign/the-esra-environmental

Just to remind you, the ESRA:

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Running Nature’s Numbers

Jun2

by: on June 2nd, 2014 | 13 Comments »

I love to poke around arguments – my own and others’ – finding all the blindspots, or at least wearing myself out trying.

credit: Creative Commons/Aaron Patterson

I like thinkers who question orthodoxies.When I wrote about Braungart and McDonough back in October, for instance, I was impressed with their questioning of sustainability as a goal (why set the bar so low?). I admired their way of working with manufacturers to create “cradle-to-cradle” products, without toxics and with effective ways to “upcycle” all organic and technological nutrients into something of equal or greater value. Their explanations of how this could be both good business and good environmentalism – and why the punitive, restrictive, more conventional approach was a tough sell – made sense to me.

But just as often, I’m surprised at how little the questioners seem to question their own assumptions.Last week, in the shade of an Ironwood on Anini Beach, my husband read me D.T. Max’s recent New Yorker profile of Mark Tercek, who came from Wall Street to remake The Nature Conservancy (TNC). Tercek’s outlook can be summarized by one of his favorite slogans: “Investing in nature is a great deal.” He believes in numbers, not stories.


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