Boeing protest

Protesters Block Entrance to Boeing. Photo credit: Alex Garland

Waking up every morning to news that Israel has bombed yet another school, mosque, or hospital in Gaza, has been so infuriating, heart wrenching and demoralizing. It has been hard to feel helpless in the face of such a large scale massacre being carried out in my name as a Jewish person. When I isolate at home watching the horrors unfold, it has been easy to spiral into a vortex of shame and immobilization about Israel’s actions.

Yesterday morning was different: instead of passively watching the news, our group of Jewish, Palestinian and allied activists made some news ourselves. Our Seattle and Tacoma chapters of Jewish Voice for Peace, along with the Seattle chapter of Queers Against Israeli Apartheid, participated in an act of civil disobedience at Boeing in Tukwila, Washington in order to stop the business of war as usual. Boeing has been a major supplier of weapons to the Israeli Defense Force, including missile systems, F15 software, and Apache Helicopters. Our aim was to draw attention to how Boeing is profiting from these horrendous attacks on civilians in Gaza.

At our die-in, nine activists, locked to each other, laid down across the crosswalk to block the entrance to Boeing, while fifty others lay down on the sidewalk, held signs, and chanted. As we blocked the entrance for three hours, we recited the names of over one thousand Palestinians who have been killed since the attacks on Gaza began on July 8th. Reading the names through the bullhorn, I looked down at the bodies lying on the ground and felt both the enormity of my grief at how many lives have been lost and the power in this small gesture of commemoration.

Earlier that morning, we met up at a park to practice before the protest, get connected in our commitment to Palestinian liberation as a group, and carpool to the action. As I watched people streaming into the park at the crack of dawn on a weekday, I felt tears well up in my eyes. It was gratifying to see so many folks willing to put their bodies on the line in solidarity with Gaza. It’s one of the few times since the attacks began that I have felt any glimmer of hope. As we took a moment to re-affirm our commitment to the action, I felt connected to the activists surrounding me, across the country, in Palestine, and around the world who are fighting for Palestinian liberation. I also felt deeply connected to my ancestors who survived pogroms and concentration camps, so that I could be here today to work for justice for all people.

 


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