Rethinking Religion

There is a ferment in the world’s religions. We have all heard about conservative and fundamentalist religion. But we hear much less about religion that is deeply spiritual and nondogmatic, that builds empathic communities and inspires people to activism to create a caring, democratic, egalitarian, and environmentally sane society. Learn about such religion and spirituality here, in articles by experts and lay members of many religions, by “spiritual but not religious” people, and by atheists and agnostics who appreciate much of what, beliefs aside, religion or spirituality does for people’s lives. Click here to read Michael Lerner's essay on God.

Most Recent Articles

Judaism

The Joy of Yom Kippur: A Conversation Between Dovid Gottlieb and Michael Lerner
by Dovid Gottlieb and Michael Lerner
Yom Kippur engages in honest, wrenching self-evaluation. Read Rabbis Dovid Gottlieb and Michael Lerner's discussion of the twenty-five hour fast.
Read more >>

Film

Rabbi Zalman and the Making of Seeking the 36
by Stephen Billias and Dennis Lanson
In 2007 the two of us—novelist Stephen Billias and filmmaker Dennis Lanson—completed our collaboration on a screenplay entitled The 36 about the Lamed Vov, the Thirty-Six Just Men of Jewish folklore. While trying to sell the screenplay, we decided to make a separate documentary film called Seeking the 36 in which we would look for the Lamed Vov living in the world today.
Read more >>

Judaism

Shavuot’s Revelation of Self
by Shmuel Klatzkin
Shavuot provides an opportunity to peer deeply into the open self, a process embodied in the receiving of Torah at Sinai. The question is: will you choose to go up?
Read more >>

Judaism

The Tikkun Passover Supplement
by Michael Lerner
The Jewish liberation holiday, Passover, has messages for anyone seeking to heal the world. This supplement expands on the Haggadah (Seder guide).
Read more >>

Interfaith

The Tao of Torah
by Charles Burack
More than a decade ago I was invited to join a monthly Torah study group in the San Francisco Bay Area that met at the homes of the group members. All of the members were currently or had once been …
Read more >>

Judaism

Jacob, Joseph, and His Brothers: A Story of Child Abuse?
by Judith Abrams
Almost no one wants to talk about the abuse of children, so it is understandable that almost no one wants to address Jacob's abuse of Joseph--yet the text itself supports this reading.
Read more >>

Judaism

Responses to the Pew Report on American Jewry
by Michael Lerner
Are Jews in existential free-fall? According to the latest Pew Research Center report, 22 percent of Jews have abandoned Judaism and only 15 percent identify Judaism as essential to being Jewish. Rabbi Michael Lerner shares some stirring responses and invites others to join the discussion as well.
Read more >>

Judaism

Jigsaw Pieces Toward the Puzzle of a Jewish Future
by Arthur Waskow
Are Jews in existential free-fall? According to the latest Pew Research Center report, 22 percent of Jews have abandoned Judaism and only 15 percent identify Judaism as essential to being Jewish. Rabbi Arthur Waskow offers an insightful response.
Read more >>

Judaism

My Response to “A Portrait of Jewish Americans”
by Rami Shapiro
Are Jews in existential free-fall? According to the latest Pew Research Center report, 22 percent of Jews have abandoned Judaism and only 15 percent identify Judaism as essential to being Jewish. Rabbi Rami Shapiro delivers a stirring response.
Read more >>

Spiritual Politics

Sikh Ethics and Political Engagement
by Simran Jeet Singh and Prabhjot Singh
Built into Sikh tradition is a firm ethic of adhering to a truthful and just process—the idea that the ends do not justify the means. As a result, simply stating that attacks upon Sikhs in a post-9/11 context are “mistaken” or “misdirected” because they should be directed toward another group, Muslims, is an untenable deflection. Instead, American Sikhs walk a thin rhetorical line between declaring what we are—a group that aims to elevate the consciousness of all people to appreciate our common divinity—and declaring what we are not in order to avoid the short-term consequences of popular confusion.
Read more >>

View all Rethinking Religion articles...