Reviews

Books

Dream-Wizardry: A Collaboration Between Rodger Kamenetz and Michael Hafftka

Jacob and Joseph begat Freud who begat Jung, who begat the poet Rodger Kamenetz and the visual artist Michael Hafftka. Their collaborative wizardry, published in the book To Die Next To You, is stunning. The poems and drawings (always paired) create vivid, waking dreams on psychological and spiritual subjects—dreams that are as resistant and open to interpretation as Pharaoh’s.
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Books

Faith and the Metaphor Muscle

To grapple well with the big challenges of our times, Hering says, we need to reclaim the language of myth, metaphor, and imagination.
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Books

Joyful Poems of Leave-Taking and Transience

Without a Claim is a book of leave-taking and transience, filled with poems about loss and decline, poems that look at the world intently but refuse to cling or assert dominion.
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Books

A Secular Analysis of Evil

In the second book of his trilogy, Lawrence Swaim explains in strictly human terms what causes aggression to replicate itself and how aggression—when rationalized, concealed, or dissembled—can become evil.
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Books

Very Much Present at the Creation: John Judis’s Book on American Jews and the Establishment of Israel

Judis’s Genesis, which stresses the importance of American Jewish/Zionist activism and lobbying in persuading President Harry Truman to support the establishment of a Jewish state, is not that different from the received narrative. What is different is that Judis makes explicit that he doesn’t understand how American Jewish liberals could so completely forsake their liberal ideas in opposing Palestinian efforts to retain their homeland.
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Books

Alona Kimhi’s Magical Brutalism

Lily La Tigresse is unsparing in its critique, but it’s also seminal in terms of launching its indictment of Israel—a society that, in Kimhi’s view, is no more generous or compassionate than the barbarous terrain of Europe, not to mention the U.S.S.R.
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Reviews

To Know Us, Study Our Arguments

Edmond H. Weiss reviews Judaism’s Great Debates: Timeless Controversies from Abraham to Herzl by Barry L. Schwartz.
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Reviews

Sifting Through Assimilation’s Wreckage to Offer Jews Redirection

Raphael Cohen reviews Schtick by Kevin Coval.
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Books

Doing Justice in an Unjust World

Thad Williamson reviews Resisting Structural Evil: Love as Ecological-Economic Vocation by Cynthia D. Moe-Lobeda.
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Books

Woolf, West, and the Conundrum of Veterans

Arguably the two most immediate—and in my judgment, truest—books from the Great War, in spite of Hemingway’s assertion that there were none, were written by authors who not only never set foot on the battlefield; neither of them was a male.
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Culture

Where Is Home? A Revolution in Our Personal Lives

Harriet Fraad reviews books by Eric Klinenberg, Arlie Russell Hochschild, Hannah Rosin, and Charles Murray.
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Culture

Democratizing Wealth, Democratizing Power

Thad Williamson reviews What Then Must We Do? Straight Talk About the Next American Revolution by Gar Alperovitz.
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Books

Spirituality in a Broken World

Larry Rasmussen reviews Spirituality: What It Is and Why It Matters by Roger S. Gottlieb.
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Books

Queering Palestinian Solidarity Work

Wendy Elisheva Somerson reviews Israel/Palestine and the Queer International by Sarah Schulman.
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Books

An End to Easy Answers: Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore’s New Memoir

Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore describes decades of queer activism in her new memoir, which is often scarring, startling, and never easy. But Sycamore confronts the problems in her life with real feeling, showing that emotion—if genuine—can often break us out of the corporate-sponsored numbness which so inundates our culture.
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