Poetry & Fiction

Morning Blessings

For Rabbi Burt Jacobson Blessed is the dog’s tongue Shamanic prayer flag Binder of vapor Harbinger of light’s arrival. Blessed is the brain stem That battled entropy All night on my behalf. Blessed are my nether, pleasure parts That double …
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Poetry

Above the Roofs of the Jewish Village

I and my imaginary lover hover above the roofs of the Jewish village. Above the courtyards, dairy barns, animal pens. Above the awnings of the chicken coops. Amid smells and clucking, cold air and wind muss her imaginary hair, soft, …
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Poetry

Wartime Train

Bone-men, smoke-souls, river-wraiths, / I am, I know, no light …
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Poetry

Bamian: A Photograph from Tricycle, 2000

(To return to the Summer 2012 Table of Contents, click here.)

Poetry

Ruins

The city as a shifting ruin / Particularly though not exclusively / As an American phenomenon / Most of my lived life / Haunts me, blocks knocked / Down in “urban renewal” now blank…
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Poetry

Night Stop

“He has only his open hand and his sweetly accusatory Bless you. We have only to turn our heads and he’s gone….”
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Poetry

Kaffiyeh on Mississippi Avenue

A poem in the Winter 2012 issue of Tikkun.
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Justice & Prisons

Poetry in the Age of Mass Incarceration

As a result of the transformation of America into an incarceration nation, the now-bursting prisons have become hotbeds of testimony, poetry, art-making, and speechifying. The books of Reginald Dwanye Betts, which are part of this flood of prison-based testimony, recount the tale of a young man who entered prison as a confused sixteen-year-old but who now, more than a decade later, has embarked on a career as a writer.
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Poetry

A Brief History of the Number Two

An online-only poem from Tikkun‘s web magazine.
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Fiction

Feral

Climbing the tree had not been a thoughtless or impetuous action. The girl had taken a Jew’s harp, a handful of dried cranberries, a scrap of blue leather, feathers, a vial of silver and turquoise beads, a needle, some thread, other secret objects, some sacred, all carefully balanced in the lap of an oversized T-shirt that the girl turned alternately into a desk, a knapsack, a handkerchief for blowing her nose, while another T-shirt became a bandanna, a snood, and a white banner that declared most adamantly: “I will not surrender.”
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Poetry

Magpies

A poem in the Fall 2011 issue of Tikkun.
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Culture

Dr. Seuss’s Progressive Politics

Dr. Seuss was, and remains two decades after his death, the world’s most popular writer of modern children’s books. He wrote and illustrated forty-four children’s books characterized by memorable rhymes, whimsical characters, and exuberant drawings that encouraged generations of children to love reading and expand their vocabularies. But, equally important, he used his pen to encourage youngsters to challenge bullies and injustice. Generations of progressive activists may not trace their political views to their early exposure to Dr. Seuss, but without doubt this shy, brilliant genius played a role in sensitizing them to abuses of power.
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Fiction

The False Bride

Outside of Simon’s office, the hum of angels’ wings moved the air like an evening breeze. The pair, one young and one old — ageless really — but one wise, one unknowing, innocent, rested on the air and waited.
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Poetry

C.K. Williams Receives the Tikkun Award

Pulitzer Prize-winning poet C.K. Williams reads “Tar” and “The Day Continues Lovely.”
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Fiction

Tales of Morality and Meaning in an Age of Global Warming

Some years ago I met a man who, over a single cup of ginger-mint tea, shook my deepest assumptions about the process of moral conversation. His name was Samuel Prana.
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