Articles

30th Anniversary Special Editorial: Tikkun at 30

Ok, I’ll admit it — I am proud of our role as a prophetic voice for peace, love, environmental sanity, social transformation, and unabashedly utopian aspirations for the world that can be. Over these past thirty years Tikkun has been …
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30th Anniversary Special Essay: On Anne Winters’ “The Displaced of Capital”

When I opened the mail back in 2000 and read the poem she had sent me, “The Displaced of Capital,” I knew I was holding in my hands a signature poem. But of course there was no way to know that, following publication in Tikkun, “The Displaced of Capital” would announce the title of her second book, one of the most important and impressive books of poetry in the last 12 years.
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Poetry

The Master of the Good Name

The Master of the Good Name who only lived for prayer, trembled by the holy ark because a Name so pure was more than a body could bear.
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Join the Mensch Movement

Earlier in the week, it appeared that the House Democrats felt helpless and perhaps hopeless about the gun situation. Every attempt to pass even small steps to decrease the number of gun deaths have been met with staunch and unflinching opposition from a legion of Republicans walking in lockstep. It took a filibuster in the Senate even to get a vote scheduled, and the House, without filibuster rules, was left with no choice but to break the rules in order to be heard.
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Why We Should Prosecute Our Own War Criminals

Another development of equal moment in the news from England was the long-awaited release on Wednesday, July 6th of the Chilcot Inquiry Report. Nearly seven years in coming, this Report presented the findings of an independent investigation chaired by Lord Chilcot that looked into the UK’s role in the Iraq War and particularly into the decision-making process of the country’s leadership.
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Fiction

The Rural Route

The gravestones rose at the top of the hill. They were black or gray, clumped together geometric and precise as if for protection from the outside world. He was mindful of how in the old country, people broke the things of the living and the dead when they vandalized cemeteries.
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Poetry

Winter Noon

“Winter Noon” by Umberto Saba with a translation by Paula Bohince.
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Politics & Society

Brussels and the Body Politic

For many years there has been concern that a terrorist strike on the networks of social connectivity, most commonly understood to include things like power grids, communications networks, and the like, could cause considerable damage to our information-based society. In many ways this concern is warranted, although the primary targets are not those infrastructural networks under corporate control, but rather much more informal networks of face-to-face community formation.
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Poetry

New Poems from Ari Banias: “An Arrow” and “Bouquet”

“An Arrow” Too often I’d like some direction but am ashamed of this fact, still I ask for it, men are supposed be bad at admitting they’re lost though why men agree to fulfill this is lost on me. Who …
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Politics & Society

The Chuppah That Held Us All: What We Found in Our Gay Marriage That the Supreme Court Missed

Our marriage, we continue to discover, is more than a mere two-person union. It is two people held in communion, sacred and spiritual association, by their community.
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Religion and Culture

Exploring the Crack in Liberalism in Israel/Palestine: Reading Atalia Omer’s When Peace is Not Enough After Bernie Sanders

Progressive American Jews are very much in favor of these peace movements. And yet many of these movements, committed to liberal ideologies, become victims to liberalism’s Achilles heel.
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Books

Reflections on Fraud and Deceit: Or, Four Splendid Summer Reads

Like Woolf’s soliloquies, Hoang’s cry out in despair, ranging in topic from the death of her sister to the verbal abuses of her then-boyfriend. And yet, like Woolf’s, her language somehow basks in that despair, flourishing even.
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Fiction

Jacobs, the Jew

Jacobs knew he was different: after his bar mitzvah he left all that mishigas behind. He looked at himself now simply as an American. He even thought about changing his name, but he knew it would kill his father.
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Stand Together or Starve Alone

I began working on this article the same day (September 8, 2015) that the U.S. Department of Agriculture released the results of its annual food security survey. The news wasn’t good. According to what is the best count we have of hungry Americans, 48 million people, or 14.3 percent of us, are considered “food insecure” or have “very low food security.” The first category refers to people who, to put it simply, experience uncertainty as to where their next meal is coming from. The second category, which includes 18 million Americans, or 5.6 percent of us, are people who suffer more severe and frequent forms of uncertainty.

These numbers sound bad, and they are, but they are even worse when you look back to the beginning of this century. The 2000 USDA food security census placed 10 percent and 3 percent of us, respectively, in these categories. In other words, the richest country in the world has not only made no progress in reducing the number of people who struggle to feed themselves, we are actually going backwards.
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American Post-Judaism with Shaul Magid

Judaism Unbound (http://www.judaismunbound.com) is a project of the Institute for the Next Jewish Future, a project that catalyzes and supports grassroots efforts by “disaffected but hopeful” American Jews to re-imagine and re-design Jewish life in America for the 21st Century. In the third of a four-part series discussing the Jewish future in America, Shaul Magid discusses his 2013 book American Post-Judaism and explores various challenges that face Jews and Judaism in America in the next generation. Focusing on the idea that America is moving into a post-ethnic phase whereby ethnicity no longer defines collectives the way it once did, Magid talks about various new forms of Jewish spiritual practice, syncretism and hybridity with other religions, the role of the non-Jew in the Jewish community, the developing role of the Holocaust and Israel in American Jewish life, the cresting of Habad’s influence, the normalization of intermarriage, the contributions ex-haredi Jews can make to American Judaism, and two models he calls “survivialism” and “spiritual humanism” that have emerged as competing paradigms in the 21st century.
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